Cincinnati communities hold meetings to discuss teen and young adult mental health

Community leaders across Cincinnati are working on new initiatives to provide trauma healing to children across the city. On Thursday, dozens of people gathered to brainstorm ways to connect kids with the help they need. The meeting centered on childhood trauma and its adverse effects on children and their progression into adulthood. Jan-Michele Kearney, vice mayor of Cincinnati, attended the meeting, along with several city council members and children’s advocacy groups. Child trauma activist Ronald Hummons has spearheaded efforts to give children the care they need. He believes it starts first with awareness and families taking action at home. “Violence, abandonment and neglect make up the perfect petri dish our children have to deal with,” Hummons said. Hummons believes it is critical to break the cycle of childhood trauma by allowing children access to services before carrying their trauma into adulthood. “They become broken adults,” Hummons said. “That’s why our prisons are full, poverty and more because these are all expressions of trauma.” Micah Engram attended Thursday’s meeting and discussed topics such as gun violence and mental health. aware of it,” said Engram. “I don’t feel like enough young people are putting energy into that subject.” Three months ago, tragedy struck her family when her older brother Cortez Wells died by suicide, three days before this 22nd birthday. experiencing pain like hers did. “He was strong and a fighter,” Engram said. “We need to stop denying these problems, and we need to realize that this is an important problem and put more effort into solving it.” No decisions or actions were taken during Thursday’s meeting, but officials say more meetings will be coming. Visit the link below to view state and local mental health resources.

Community leaders across Cincinnati are working on new initiatives to provide trauma treatment for children across the city.

On Thursday, dozens of people gathered to brainstorm ways to connect kids with the help they need. The meeting centered on childhood trauma and its adverse effects on children and their progression into adulthood.

The Vice Mayor of Cincinnati, Jan-Michele Kearney, attended the meeting along with several city council members and children’s advocacy groups.

Childhood trauma activist Ronald Hummons has spearheaded efforts to give children the care they need. He believes it starts first with awareness and families taking action at home.

“The violence, the neglect and the neglect are the perfect petri dish that our children have to deal with,” Hummons said.

Hummons believes it is critical to break the cycle of childhood trauma by giving children access to services before they carry their trauma into adulthood.

“They become broken adults,” Hummons said. “That’s why our prisons are full, poverty and more because these are all expressions of trauma.”

Micah Engram attended Thursday’s meeting and discussed topics such as gun violence and mental health.

“I wanted to start recognizing mental health and make people more aware of it,” Engram said. “I don’t feel like enough young people are putting energy into that subject.”

Three months ago, tragedy struck her family when her older brother Cortez Wells died by suicide three days before this 22nd birthday.

Her mission is to prevent families from experiencing pain like hers.

β€œHe was strong and a fighter,” said Engram. “We need to stop denying these problems, and we need to realize that this is an important problem and put more effort into solving it.”

No decisions or actions were taken during Thursday’s meeting, but officials say more meetings will be forthcoming.

Visit the link below to view state and local mental health resources.

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