Ivan Bates wins Democratic primaries for Baltimore City SAO

BALTIMORE — After days of vote counting, Ivan Bates is the expected winner of the 2022 Democratic primary for Baltimore City state attorney, according to the Associated Press. Bates defeated incumbent Marilyn Mosby and Thiru Vignarajah in a race that was a rematch from 2018. By the end of the week, Mosby dropped from second to third. At the end of Friday afternoon, Bates extended his early lead over Mosby and Vignarajah caught up with her. While there are still many votes to be counted and Mosby hasn’t relented on Friday night, Bates is already looking ahead to the November election. WBAL-TV 11 News spoke with Bates Friday night, who said he feels good about the general election and will continue to carry his name. He said Baltimore decided it was time for a change and that he is ready to lead. “I am very humbled and very blessed to have this opportunity,” Bates said. national headlines in 2015 when she brought criminal charges against six police officers for the death of Freddie Gray. She herself was indicted by a grand jury in January on two counts of perjury and making false statements about a loan application. She insists she did nothing wrong. Still, on election night, Mosby was optimistic about keeping her seat. “I will always be the best I can be until every vote is counted. I’m going to fight — the same way I fought to get into this position — until every vote is counted,” Mosby told supporters late Tuesday night. Bates said he feels the number one concern among voters this time around was safety. “People are afraid to leave their homes. People are afraid of crime,” he said. “We didn’t have voters who hardly ever mentioned that he was being charged. Their whole displeasure was that the crime was getting out of hand and someone had to do something.” WBAL-TV 11 News contacted Vignarajah’s campaign, who did not return calls or emails Friday night. WBAL Radio reported that Mosby’s team is expected to make a statement on Saturday. In the run-up to the primaries, Mosby ran on her record, while her Democratic opponents both insisted it’s time for a change. At a Candidates Forum hosted by the Canton Community Association and streamed live on WBALTV.com in late June, Bates and Vignarajah and independent candidate Roya Hanna, who will appear on the November ballot, focused on issues such as crime and talked about overthrowing Mosby’s policy of not prosecuting petty crime in the city. Mosby did not participate in the forum. Mosby spent Election Day visiting polling stations with the message to voters that her opponents want to return to the era of zero tolerance and mass incarceration. “There is a very clear distinction between me and my opponents. Both go back to an era of zero tolerance policing, which led to mass incarceration and police abuse. We cannot go backwards. We must move forward, and that is what this election is about Mosby said. Mosby said she wants a third term because there is a lot more work to do. “We have one standard of justice, regardless of race, gender, religion, profession or zip code,” Mosby said. “We need to continue that standard of justice so that we can break through those barriers of mistrust in our communities.” Mosby portrayed himself as a progressive prosecutor. Political observers still give her the advantage because she is an incumbent. Bates, a lawyer, said he has knocked on more than 15,000 doors, and if elected, he said he will focus on illegal weapons and the harsh consequences of possessing and using weapons to commit a crime. . Bates highlights his experience as a former prosecutor and attorney. “If you look at those two things, the prosecutor’s office has a big problem in the office right now – prosecutors don’t want to be there, lawyers don’t want work there. They want to come and work with me and for me. I’m the only one person in this race they want to come back to work with,” Bates said. “If you have an illegal gun in Baltimore City, you will be held accountable and you will go to jail.” Vignanajah took to the streets on the day of the first election to hand out campaign literature. After months of campaigning, he said he knows what voters want. “People are desperate for change. There is a hunger for a clear vision and a real leader,” said Vignanajah. “This era of lawlessness must end. From carjackers and killers to squeegees and dirt bikes, the city feels out of control. The prosecutor can get it back under control, and I’m excited to do that.” pundits said Bates and Vignarajah split the vote and that the wildcard this time around is whether voters are concerned about the federal indictment hanging over Mosby.

BALTIMORE — After days of vote counting, Ivan Bates is the expected winner of the 2022 Democratic primary for Baltimore City state attorney, according to the Associated Press.

Bates defeated Marilyn Mosby and Thiru Vignarajah for two terms in a race that was a 2018 rematch.

By the end of the week, Mosby dropped from second to third. At the end of Friday afternoon, Bates extended his early lead over Mosby and Vignarajah caught up with her. While there are still many votes to be counted and Mosby hasn’t relented on Friday night, Bates is already looking ahead to the November election.

WBAL-TV 11 News spoke with Bates Friday night, who said he feels good about the general election and that he will continue to make his name known. He said Baltimore decided it was time for a change and that he is ready to lead.

“I am very humbled and very blessed to have this opportunity,” Bates said.

Bates defeated his challengers, Vignarajah and Mosby, who first made national headlines in 2015 when she brought criminal charges against six police officers for the death of Freddie Gray.

She herself was indicted by a grand jury in January on two counts of perjury and making false statements about a loan application. She insists she did nothing wrong.

Still, on election night, Mosby was optimistic about keeping her seat.

“I will always be the best I can be until every vote is counted. I’m going to fight — the same way I fought to get into this position — until every vote is counted,” Mosby told supporters late Tuesday night.

Bates said he feels the number one concern among voters this time around was safety.

“People are afraid to leave their homes. People are afraid of crime,” he said. “We didn’t have voters who rarely mentioned that he was being charged. Their whole displeasure was that the crime was getting out of hand and someone had to do something.”

WBAL-TV 11 News contacted Vignarajah’s campaign, who did not answer calls or emails Friday night.

WBAL Radio reported that Mosby’s team is expected to make a statement on Saturday.

In the run-up to the primaries

Mosby ran on her record while her Democratic opponents both argued it’s time for a change.

At a Candidate Forum hosted by the Canton Community Association in late June and broadcast live on WBALTV.com, Bates and Vignarajah and independent candidate Roya Hanna, who will appear on the November vote, focused on issues of crime and spoke. about toppling Mosby’s policy of not prosecuting petty crime in the city. Mosby did not participate in the forum.

Mosby spent Election Day visiting polling stations with the message to voters that her opponents want to return to the era of zero tolerance and mass incarceration.

“There is a very clear distinction between me and my opponents. Both run back to an era of zero tolerance policing, which led to mass incarceration and police abuse. We cannot go backwards. We have to keep moving forward, and that is where this election is.” revolves around,” Mosby said.

Mosby said she wants a third term because there is still a lot of work to do.

“We have one standard of justice, regardless of race, gender, religion, profession or zip code,” Mosby said. “We need to continue that standard of justice so that we can break through those barriers of mistrust in our communities.”

Mosby portrayed himself as a progressive prosecutor. Political observers still give her the advantage because she is an incumbent.

Bates, a lawyer, said he has knocked on more than 15,000 doors, and if elected, he said he will focus on illegal weapons and the harsh consequences of owning and using weapons to commit a crime. . Bates highlights his experience as a former prosecutor and attorney.

“If you look at those two things, the prosecutor’s office now has a big problem in the office — prosecutors don’t want to be there, lawyers don’t want to work there. They want to come and work with me and for me. I’m the only one person in this race that they want to come back to work with,” Bates said. “If you have an illegal gun in Baltimore City, you will be held accountable and you will go to jail.”

Vignanajah took to the streets on the day of the first election to hand out campaign literature. After months of campaigning, he said he knows what voters want.

“People are desperate for change. There is a hunger for a clear vision and a real leader,” said Vignanajah. “This era of lawlessness must come to an end. From carjackers and murderers, to squeegees and dirt bikes, the city feels out of control. The prosecutor can get it back under control, and I’m excited to do that. “

Political pundits said Bates and Vignarajah split the vote and the wildcard this time around is whether voters are concerned about the federal indictment hanging over Mosby.

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