Mental health for ourselves and children

You don’t have to know the 19 children or the two teachers who were murdered in Uvalde, Texas to be sad about the recent events. The futility, the horror and the loss have torn the hearts of millions and maybe yours. That’s why mental health professionals like Yale’s Dr. Kyle Pruitt urge us to take care of ourselves and our loved ones. “That takes some thinking, and some reflection, and some conversation. You don’t want to use the conversation with your kids to figure out how you’re feeling,” says Dr. Kyle Pruitt, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine. Ali Landry, a licensed mental health counselor, said we can feel stupid when we’re emotional about something so distant, but that’s natural empathy at work. “It’s completely expected and normal to experience the feelings , like anger, or shock, or denial, or sadness, and those feelings can potentially come in waves,” Landry said. Staying in a routine is also a great idea for you and your kids, according to psychotherapist and author Niro Feliciano. Feliciano states to consider your child’s age before engaging in conversation.”I think we should just start with an open-ended question. How are you? Did you hear anything today that you want to talk about? Do you have any questions?” Feliciano said. Feliciano said they should pay a little extra attention, even if they don’t talk about it either. “So changes in eating or sleeping patterns, changes in behavior, are they acting?” said Feliciano Pruitt and Feliciano agreed to make your kids feel as safe as possible. Pruitt said it’s hard when it feels like safety isn’t always a guarantee in this world. “Now we have to say that the adults in our community and around the world are doing everything we can to make sure all schools and all schoolchildren we live in are safe,” Pruitt said. The conversations can be difficult, but when life turns out to be so fragile, talking can help us become stronger And if they ask you the really hard question, ‘Why did this happen?’ And then the answer, of course, is that we don’t have all the answers to why these things happen,” Pruitt said.

You don’t have to know the 19 children or the two teachers who were murdered in Uvalde, Texas to be sad about the recent events.

The futility, the horror and the loss have torn the hearts of millions and maybe yours.

That’s why mental health professionals like Yale’s Dr. Kyle Pruitt urging us to take care of ourselves and our loved ones.

“That takes some thought, some reflection, and some conversation. You don’t want to use the conversation with your kids to figure out how you’re feeling,” Dr. Kyle Pruitt, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Yale School of Medicine, said.

Ali Landry, a licensed mental health counselor, said we can feel stupid when we’re emotional about something so far away, but that’s natural empathy at work.

“It’s completely expected and normal to experience the feelings, like anger, or shock, or denial, or sadness, and those feelings can potentially come in waves,” Landry said.

According to psychotherapist and author Niro Feliciano, it’s also a good idea for you and your kids to stay in a routine.

Feliciano suggests considering your child’s age before engaging in conversation.

“I think we should just start with an open question. How are you? Did you hear something today that you want to talk about? Do you have any questions?” said Feliciano.

Feliciano said to pay extra attention, even though they don’t talk about it.

“So changes in eating or sleeping patterns, behavioral changes, do they act out?” said Feliciano.

Pruitt and Feliciano agreed to make your kids feel as safe as possible.

Pruitt said it’s hard when it feels like safety isn’t always a guarantee in this world.

“Now we have to say that the adults in our community and around the world are doing everything they can to ensure that all schools and all schoolchildren where we live are safe,” Pruitt said.

The conversations can be difficult, but when life turns out to be so fragile, talking can help us grow stronger.

“And then if they ask you the really hard question, ‘Why did this happen?’ And then, of course, the answer is that we don’t have all the answers to why these things happen,” Pruitt said.

Leave a Comment