Minorities face obstacles when they need help for mental health

There are many obstacles to overcome before many people of color can even get mental health help. .Alexander Blanc has always worked hard to help his community, but inside he faced difficulties that others did not see. “Lucky, for a long time I pretended. Laughing because the world tells you you should be, but inside I feel like I just existed,” Blanc said. In the end, Blanc accepted that he had to address the issues that were causing his pain. life and I went through these changes emotionally and things like that, I naturally started to have my traumas, and I started to realize that some things were out of my control and I couldn’t control my emotions as much as I wanted to,” said Blanc. Blanc started the process of finding someone to alk to, a process that can be difficult, especially for disadvantaged communities. It’s an issue that Dr. Linda Darrell said can be a major barrier to accessing care. struggle with this,” says Darrell, of Morgan State University School of Social Work. Darrell said it could be a problem “in terms of available services or counselors or social workers or psychologists to really help them, people who are like them Blanc said it took him a while to find someone to help, but it was worth it. He found a therapist who is Haitian just like him.” That went into finding the therapist I thought was the best for me, but I did it,” Blanc said. There are many barriers to care, including what Dr. Laurens Van Sluytman of Morgan State’s School of Social Work described as structural problems.’ Who’s going to take care of the childcare? When will I get time off to do that? When can I actually have it done?” Van Sluytman said. Another obstacle is the stigma that comes with admitting that you need help. people struggle, it becomes a challenge,” said Van Sluytman. If left unchecked, the consequences could be dire. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, suicide was the second leading cause of death for African Americans aged 15 to 15 in 2019. age 24. don’t know what they’re going through,” Blanc said. Blanc said he plans to start a podcast to address some of these issues and reduce the stigma. He said he lives by the advice that was given to him by an elder in his community: “Life gets better when you help others who are in a worse situation.” months They said it’s good to see people asking for help, but they are concerned that there are many who will be discouraged because it is so difficult to find a doctor with openings.

There are many obstacles to overcome before many people of color can even get help for mental health.

The need for mental health care has skyrocketed during the COVID-19 pandemic — that’s on top of a system that was already overwhelmed before COVID-19.

Alexander Blanc has always worked hard to help his community, but inside he faced problems that others did not see.

“Happiness, for a long time I pretended. For a long time you smile and you smile because the world tells you you should be, but inside I feel like I just existed,” Blanc said.

Ultimately, Blanc accepted that he needed to address the issues that were causing his pain.

“As I started going through life and I was going through these changes and things of that nature emotionally, I naturally started to have my traumas, and I started to realize that some things were out of my control and I couldn’t control my emotions like that. if I wanted to,” said Blanc.

Blanc began the process of finding someone to talk to, a process that can be difficult, especially for underserved communities. It’s a problem that Dr. Linda Darrell said it can be a major barrier to accessing care.

“People struggle with this,” says Darrell, of the Morgan State University School of Social Work.

Darrell said it could be a problem “in terms of available services or counselors or social workers or psychologists to really help them, people who are like them.”

Blanc said it took him a while to find someone to help, but it was worth it. He found a therapist who is Haitian just like him.

“To be able to maneuver through the cultural differences and the ethnic differences, and that I’m just a black man and meaning from day to day, there were a lot of things that went into finding the therapist that I felt was the best was the best for me, but I did it,” said Blanc.

There are many barriers to care, including what Dr. Laurens Van Sluytman of Morgan State’s School of Social Work described as structural problems.

“Who’s going to take care of the childcare? When will I get time off to do that? When can I really get that done?” said Van Sluytman.

Another obstacle is the stigma that comes with admitting that you need help.

“(That’s) tied to our history, where we have to be strong or a sense of weakness is seen as a problem for some families. So admitting someone is having a hard time becomes a challenge,” Van Sluytman said.

If nothing is done, the consequences could be serious. According to the Department of Health and Human Services, suicide was the second leading cause of death for African Americans aged 15 to 24 in 2019.

“It scared me to know that you could be next to someone and you could see them every day without knowing what they’re going through,” Blanc said.

Blanc said he plans to start a podcast to address some of these issues and reduce the stigma. He said he lives by the advice an elder in his community has given him: “Life gets better when you help others who are in a worse situation.”

The doctors who spoke to 11 News all said their caseloads have increased significantly in recent months. They said it’s good to see people asking for help; however, they worry that there are many who will be discouraged because it is so difficult to find a doctor with openings.

Leave a Comment