Mona Lisa cake attack video leaves internet baffled

A man smeared cake on the Mona Lisa in the Louvre. He had disguised himself as an elderly woman to get close to the painting.

He was unable to do much damage to the painting, as it is protected by bulletproof glass. Videos of the man have gone viral on social media.

Maybe this is just crazy to me, but a man dressed as an old lady jumps out of a wheelchair and tried to break the bulletproof glass of the Mona Lisa. He then spreads cake on the glass and throws roses everywhere before being tackled by security. † https://t.co/OFXdx9eWcM


The man used a wheelchair to get close to the Mona Lisa

Can someone translate what the old fellow said as they escorted him out? https://t.co/Uy2taZ4ZMm

According to the report, the man used a wheelchair to make his disguise look real. As soon as he got close to the painting, he jumped out of the chair and ran towards the painting.

He tried to break the bulletproof glass that protected Leonardo da Vinci’s most famous work of art. When he didn’t, he spread cake on the glass and threw rose petals everywhere.

The man also shouted a slogan in French. The slogan was translated by a Twitter user, Marie Line Ulysse. It said:

“Think about the earth, the planet, some people just destroy the planet. Think about this, every artist cares about the planet, that’s why I did that.”

His short exhibit ended when security arrived and took him away.

The Mona Lisa is undoubtedly the most famous painting in the world. Thousands of fans gather every day to view the painting in the Louvre. Many of those visitors have recorded and uploaded videos of the man online.

The video has generated a mix of hilarious and shocking reactions from the netizens. Many felt that the man should be punished for his vandalism. At the same time, many were confused about the connection between the Mona Lisa and the environment.

@anusehgal He must be punished! The Mona Lisa is a masterpiece, its beauty can only be understood when you actually see it. Left me spellbound!

@lukeXC2002 I wonder how much the fine would be for something like that.

@lukeXC2002 So destroying the world’s most famous painting will save the Earth? Must be a Habs fan.

Many pointed to the presence of bulletproof glass protecting the painting.

Mona Lisa painting smeared with cake by a man in a wheelchair! Luckily it was protected by a glass! Shows such a disruptive and sad mentality from people all over the world! 🤯 https://t.co/tgJl0GxmqO

@lukeXC2002 Has he forgotten the glass for the painting?

@lukeXC2002 Good thing the painting is protected by bulletproof glass

@lukeXC2002 So the cake is not on the piano, but on the bulletproof glass that protects it.

Others took their chances and joked about the situation.

@lukeXC2002 If only there was one good guy with pie, this wouldn’t have happened.

@lukeXC2002 It’s what they call fine art these days with some cake

@lukeXC2002 The crazy things they’ll do for Tiktok glory…

@lukeXC2002 I bet the fake old lady calls herself an artist..


This is not the first time the painting has been vandalized

The painting was made by Da Vinci sometime between 1503 and 1519. It was treated like any other work of art by the revolutionary until it was stolen in 1911 by an Italian handyman named Vincenzo Peruggia, who hid it for two years. The Mona Lisa became extremely popular and became a household name in Paris during that time. Peruggia later returned the painting due to guilt.

Noah Charney, art history professor and author, explained how the painting grew in popularity. He said:

“There was nothing that really set it apart in itself, except that it was a very good work by a very famous artist – until it was stolen. The theft is what really boosted its appeal and made it a household name.”

Since then, the painting has been the target of numerous vandalism.

A man poured sulfuric acid over it and destroyed the lower part in the 1950s. A Bolivian student hit it with a rock. A woman in a wheelchair sprayed red paint on the painting, sharing her disagreement about the lack of ramps, at a 1974 Tokyo exhibition. A Russian tourist threw tea at the painting in 2009.


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